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Woman's pantry full of old fast food sparks debate: 'I'd still eat it!'

A nutritionist's cupboard full of unwrapped junk food that seemingly never go bad has sparked debate on TikTok. Read more.

A nutritionist's cupboard full of unwrapped junk food that seemingly never go bad has sparked debate on TikTok.

Video of the cupboard and its contents, including pizza, burgers, fries, doughnuts and more, was shared by the woman's daughter known as Elif Kandemir on the social media platform. It has since gone viral with over 3.3 million views. 

A nutritionist's cupboard full of unwrapped junk food that seemingly never go bad has sparked debate on TikTok. Photo: TikTok/@elifgkandemirA nutritionist's cupboard full of unwrapped junk food that seemingly never go bad has sparked debate on TikTok. Photo: TikTok/@elifgkandemir

A nutritionist's cupboard full of unwrapped junk food that seemingly never go bad has sparked debate on TikTok. Photo: TikTok/@elifgkandemir

"This is my mum's food cupboard - full of foods that never go off!" she wrote on the video. "My mum is a nutritionist helping to tackle obesity."

"These foods shown here are ultra-processed foods that 80 per cent of the UK consume on a regular basis," Elif added.

"Still fancy that burger?" she asked in the caption.

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"Probably still eat it," one user jokingly responded, with another agreeing, "Nah, I'd still eat it."

"I've [definitely] seen mouldy pizza and doughnuts? So they do go off?" another user questioned.

"All of those foods have gone 'off'. They will be very very dry. It's foods that don't mould, which is a separate thing," a third said.

"I legit thought this was a snack cupboard," someone else joked.

Some TikTok users joked they'd still eat the food. Photo: TikTok/@elifgkandemirSome TikTok users joked they'd still eat the food. Photo: TikTok/@elifgkandemir

Some TikTok users joked they'd still eat the food. Photo: TikTok/@elifgkandemir

"How interesting... Well I'm here for a good time, not a long time," another quipped.

"Fast food, fast death," one added.

Many others pointed out that there are many families across the world who work long hours but are barely getting by and they are often forced to resort to foods such as these.

In a follow-up video, in response to a comment that said all foods are fine in moderation, Elif claimed that her mum is a psychotherapist and nutritionist, who had been collecting some of the dishes for two years.

"Most of this food she’s been collecting over the last two years, so most of it is one to two years old," she explained. "80 per cent of the UK are now eating this diet, probably without knowledge of what they are eating."

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"And though it is true, that you can have anything and everything in moderation, 80 per cent of a person’s diet should not be made up of these foods," Elif said in the video.

She added, "No food is off-limits, my mum is simply trying to encourage people to make better food decisions and live a happier, healthier lifestyle."

Elif referenced a BBC documentary featuring British doctor Chris van Tulleken who spent four weeks on a strict junk food diet including frozen pizza, fried chicken, fish sticks, cereals and other ready-made meals.

Speaking to The Telegraph about the experiment, the doctor explained, "My libido, piles, heartburn … everything got worse. I was anxious, depressed — and it was all self-perpetuating."

"Things like monosodium glutamate (MSG) send a signal to your brain telling you this is nutritious," he said. "But when you digest it there is nothing [nutritious] there — so you keep eating."

An MRI showed that the poor diet had a similar effect of drugs or alcohol to an addict.

According to the New York Post, it's believed a lack of moisture in the food is the reason some foods are seemingly ageless.

They revealed that an investigation by Serious Eats found that a McDonald's hamburger patty is just thin enough to dehydrate rather than rot. 

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